Frank Duck Brings 'em Back Alive
Studio: Disney Release Date : November 1, 1946 Series: Donald and Goofy
  1. General Info

Cumulative rating: No Ratings Posted

Synopsis

In a switch from "Tiger Trouble" and "African Diary", this time Donald plays the great white hunter, going after the "wild man of the jungle", Goofy.

Characters

Goofy
Donald Duck
(Voice: Clarence "Ducky" Nash)

Credits

Director

Jack Hannah

Animator

Hugh Fraser
Jim Moore
Al Coe
Andy Engman

Story

Dick Kinney

Music

Oliver Wallace

Layout

Yale Gracey

Producer

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney

Television

Donald's Quack Attack (Season 1, Episode 5)

Video Information

VHS

Germany

Donald Ich bin der Größte

France

Donald Vedette de Television

Italy

La Storia de Paperino
Video Parade 4

Laserdisc (CAV)

Japan

Donald Duck : A Star is Born

Laserdisc (CLV)

Japan

Merry Christmas
This is Your Life Donald Duck
Mickey's Jungle Trouble

DVD

United States

The Chronological Donald: Volume 2: 1942-1946

Germany

Disney Treasures : Wave 5 : The Chronological Donald Volume 2

Technical Specifications

MPAA No.: 10977
Running time: 7:09
Animation Type: Standard (Hand-drawn-Cel) Animation
Aspect Ratio: 1.37 : 1
Color Type: Technicolor
Sound Type: Mono: RCA Sound Recording
Print Type: 35mm
Negative Type: 35mm
Cinematographic Format: Spherical
Original Language: English

Reviews and Comments

From Dan :

Not only my favorite Disney cartoon, but my favorite cartoon of all time, Frank Duck Brings 'Em Back Alive is a superbly made cartoon that has inexplicably been shown on television only a few times in comparison to others. What makes it so great is not only its beautiful depiction of a dark jungle, but it is very thrilling. As (literally) goofy as the wild man is, the notion of a lone explorer in the jungle tracking down the "savage" is exciting. Also it is very fast moving and humorous, with Donald and Goofy working well together as usual. Brilliant cartoon, should be showed far more often than it has been.

From Thad Komorowski :

Believe me, this is NOT the same premise I had in mind when I heard of the cartoon's title. Goofy is the appropriate wildman, and Donald is the great, white hunter (pun intended). A good cartoon, it's really a shame that this one never aired too much.

From Baruch Weiss :

This short was pretty funny. I liked the scene where Goofy eats Donald's contract.

From Ryan Kilpatrick at The Disney Film Project :

I have made no secret that my two favorite of the Fab Five Disney characters are Donald and Goofy. So it should be no surprise that I enjoy the shorts where the two of them get together. In Frank Duck Brings Em Back Alive, though, it feels like we have a rehash of another company’s material, and it diminishes both of the Disney characters.

Goofy here plays the role of a feral wild man, lost in the jungle. The titular Frank Duck, played by Donald, arrives in the jungle to take him away. No one consulted the Goof about this decision, however, so he manages to fight back with all the resistance he can muster. While this leads to great gags, it feels like something we’ve seen before.

That’s probably my modern retrospective eyes talking. This seems like something that we would have seen many times from the Elmer Fudd/Bugs Bunny camp, and it plays that way. In doing so, Goofy tends to act out of character. He is not supposed to be a cunning acrobat who gets the last word on his opponent. Goofy is supposed to be a bumbler who lucks into (or out of) great fortune.

That Goofy, though, is not what we get here. Jungle wild man Goofy is a confident bumbler, if such a thing can be said. While he still makes some simple mistakes, like helping Donald with a cage that the duck wants to put him in, this Goofy is smarter than Donald. That shouldn’t be the case.

Donald acts the way he should for the most part. He is aggressive and irritable, but still easily fooled by the Goof. That leads to some great gags, like the cage carrying scene, where Goofy gets trapped in a cage with no bottom, but Donald lifts it up to carry it anyway, not realizing that Goofy is not inside. That’s just one gag, but there were plenty more, and they weren’t bad for the most part.

The final one was my favorite, however, as the two enter a darkened cave during their chase, and end up switching clothes somehow. I will not speculate what Donald and Goofy were doing in the cave, but the clothes get swapped and they are chased out by a lion. It’s funny, but again it feels a bit more Looney Tunes than Disney. That’s not necessarily bad, but it keeps Frank Duck from being one of my favorites.


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Screenshots

Submitted by eutychus

Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings Screenshots from the 1946 Disney cartoon Frank Duck Brings

History

8/20/2012

  • Credits added by eutychus

9/12/2012

  • Home video info added by eutychus

8/2/2013

  • Television info added by eutychus

9/18/2013

  • Tech specs added by eutychus

6/19/2017

  • Credits added by kintutoons32

Sources

Jack Hannah: Director
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Hugh Fraser: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Jim Moore: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Al Coe: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Andy Engman: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Dick Kinney: Story
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Oliver Wallace: Music
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Yale Gracey: Layout
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney: Producer
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)