The IAD Sound Effects Discussion Thread - Forum.
OutOfOdor
2020-02-10T22:41:51Z
As a bit of a sound geek, one of my personal favorite facets of the animated cartoon are the sound effects. Those silly and funny, overly-exaggerated boings, zips, bomb drops, bullet ricochets, car skids, etc. that have endeared themselves to both geeks like ourselves and casual 'toon watchers all over the world. I'll even watch the worst animation out there just because I'm fascinated by the great sound effects. I even keep a personal library of hundreds, if not thousands, of SFX for use in whatever that includes a whole mess of effects created and recorded way back originally from the libraries of Hanna-Barbera, Warner Bros., Disney and others.

I often find myself wondering where certain effects came from that I've heard in a variety of projects, how certain sounds were created, or even who created certain effects. Heck, I personally would prefer designing and editing sounds for comical cartoons than for serious, dramatic stuff because, in my opinion, it gives you the opportunity to exaggerate sounds and creatively apply effects to actions that don't make that sound in the real world. You can't run willy-nilly to the sound of rapidly played bongo drums, nor can you dash off to the sound of a bullet ricocheting. You don't hear a fog horn out of nowhere when you come across a most horrible stench, nor can your doggy, all of a sudden, emit a woman's scream when they see something shocking. That's the fun of cartoon sound design right there.

I really appreciate and admire the craft of the sound effects editor in animation, in the Golden Age, and in contemporary animation. In older TV cartoons, even during the dark ages of the medium on the small screen, too, I'll constantly find moments of sound design that strike me as very creative, very funny. The people who created these wonderful, timeless sounds were geniuses. Treg Brown originated many hilarious sounds, and used recordings from the live-action editorial department of the WB studio to humorous, wildly creative effect. Jimmy MacDonald at Disney, invented several original contraptions devised to replicate rain falling or a fly buzzing about. The fellows at MGM, like Fred McAlpin, Jim Faris and Lovell Norman strike me as uniquely creative individuals whose creativity never cease to amuse me. Who knew a gunshot could be used for a mallet to the head, or for a baseball hitting a ball, to great comic effect? They did.

The FX people at the Hanna-Barbera studio also strike me as very creative, and the effects they came up with, although you've heard them scads of times in all sorts of places, are also really, really great, and some of them leave me scratching my head as to how they came up with them. I also personally really like some of the weird FX used in the Detich-produced Tom and Jerry cartoons. That loud "boi-oi-oing!" never fails to make me laugh. I also really admire the sound design work on Ren and Stimpy and SpongeBob in terms of creativity and entertainment value.

Making a long story short- I love cartoon sound effects. Personally, it IRKS me that we don't get much discussion on sound effects over here, and I think this topic should remedy that situation. What it is, basically, is a general topic for discussion on anything sound effects in cartoons. Although it's in the "TTTP in Exile" board, feel free to discuss SFX in TV and contemporary 'toons as well. Even the "Terry Splash."
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
Ken Layton
2020-02-11T03:39:08Z
Terrytoons recorded even in the mid 1950's sounded like they were recorded on equipment manufactured in 1930.
Gnik_LJN
2020-02-11T05:11:54Z
Early Max Fleischer sound shorts, as well as some later ones, tend to have one particular sound effect I can't quite grasp but still really like. It's roughly like "ck-li-li-li-li-li-li-ling". That's usually associated with mincers or vices or anything involving mechanical devices (You can hear it in "Swing You Sinners" or "Can You Take It" for example)
nickramer
2020-02-17T04:11:25Z
Originally Posted by: Ken Layton 

Terrytoons recorded even in the mid 1950's sounded like they were recorded on equipment manufactured in 1930.



Well, that's what you expect from a studio that was run by a stubborn cheapskate.
OutOfOdor
2020-02-17T16:00:10Z
Originally Posted by: Gnik_LJN 

Early Max Fleischer sound shorts, as well as some later ones, tend to have one particular sound effect I can't quite grasp but still really like. It's roughly like "ck-li-li-li-li-li-li-ling". That's usually associated with mincers or vices or anything involving mechanical devices (You can hear it in "Swing You Sinners" or "Can You Take It" for example)



Unfortunately, Gnik, I can't tell you how that sound was made. If I do figure it out I'll let you know.!

Originally Posted by: Ken Layton 

Terrytoons recorded even in the mid 1950's sounded like they were recorded on equipment manufactured in 1930.



Brother, you ain't a-joshin'! "Time Warp Toons" might be an apt moniker for these before a certain Mr. Deitch came in.

In terms of the sound effects, I personally think they got better in the late 50s and 60s. If you watch, say, an old Deputy Dawg or Sidney and compare the FX with those in a 50s Heckle and Jeckle or Dinky Duck, you'll notice a significant improvement of effects. They seem to have abandoned the old assortment and created a totally new set of mostly original sounds, which in my opinion are much better than the really small assortment the studio originally had.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
nickramer
2020-02-17T21:07:01Z
Not only that, but the music also improved. Phil seemed relieved when he was given the chance to do music his way and not Paul's.
OutOfOdor
2020-03-02T00:17:28Z
Originally Posted by: nickramer 

Not only that, but the music also improved. Phil seemed relieved when he was given the chance to do music his way and not Paul's.


That, too.

Anyway, allow me to enlighten you about a particular subject in the world of cartoon SFX that's kinda fascinated me for a while: the several different SFX libraries Chuck Jones used during his post-WB years. "Gay Purr-ee" doesn't count for obvious reasons, although he wrote the screenplay for that with his wife.

The first batch of the Tom and Jerry cartoons he did for Metro, namely the ones produced by SIB Tower 12 as an independent company, for the most part use what appear to be original effects. I really like a lot of those, and wish they were available on a stock sound library, but that's only a pipe dream. Wonder who created them? Anyways, most of them were original, but there are a few effects that aren't, namely a few bullet ricochets (a few from an unidentified source, although Disney used a variation of one of them, a few others from WB), plus this one machine gun sound heard in "Snowbody Loves Me" and a WB jet sound. There's one oddball entry in this batch in terms of SFX, namely "Is There a Doctor in the Mouse?" It seems obvious to me that Joe Siracusa was moonlighting from Format Films to do this one, as you can hear an awful lot of Jay Ward sound effects in that one (plus one of the Hanna-Barbera quick whistle zips, an MGM/H-B ricochet and a Disney boing sound).

Starting with (I think) "Ah, Sweet Mouse-Story of Life" (in terms of production order, I think), Chuck and his crew now were working for MGM's new cartoon studio and the editors start using numerous sounds from the MGM library in addition to the ones in SIB Tower 12's sound library, mostly ones dating to the Cinemascope era, although a few 40s and 50s (pre-CS) effects show up, like some of Bill Hanna's painful yells and some steel guitar slide effects (one of them is used for Tom zipping back into the locker room in "Salt Water Tabby"). There are a few effects, too, that seem like soundalikes of old 40s-era MGM sounds, namely of what is referred to on the Hanna-Barbera stock library from Sound Ideas as a "peeong," and of those two jew's harp boing sounds. Most of these can be found on the Sony sound effects library.

There are a few other original sounds created during this era, though, like this one sound used for Tom running in the trash can in "Filet Meow" and a glass shatter used for Tom breaking into a million pieces in "The A-Tom-Inable Snowman." There are a few other sounds of note, like a zip sound heard in a few later cartoons like "Snowman" (Jerry zipping back into the cuckoo clock) and "Filet Meow" (the shark passing through the house), which can, oddly, also be heard in the DFE Road Runner cartoon "Sugar and Spies" for Wile E. diving behind a rock to avoid getting hit by a cannonball. A couple of spacey electronic whining sounds used by Art Clokey shows up in a few of these, usually in altered in some way. Some WB sounds also show up here as well, plus a bomb fall sound used by WB and Famous Studios.

After his partnership with MGM ended, Jones started using the Horta-Mahana post service, the same one Filmation used for much of its lifespan, so you start hearing lower-quality copies of Hanna-Barbera's sound effects in specials like "A Cricket in Times Square" and "The White Seal." Some of the original sounds developed during Jones' time at MGM show up as well. I'd like to think that H-M did that odd PSA Jones did with Wile E. and Shamu I posted on the YT thread, but I'm not 100% positive. Weirdly, the Road Runner segments Jones produced for the CTW series "The Electric Company" don't seem to use this library, being almost in a world of their own in terms of SFX. A few H-B sounds, plus a couple of WB effects, and a few other sounds I recognize (including a ricochet heard in "Tom-ic Energy" for example), but that's it. Oddly, a airplane diving sound that isn't WB of origin is used for the Road Runner in most of these.

Starting with "Raggedy Ann and the Pumpkin Who Couldn't Smile" begins what is to me the most fascinating era of Jones' post-Warners animation career in terms of SFX, courtesy Mr. Rich Harrison. I wish I knew what sound library he used, but Art Clokey in the 60s and Sam Singer in "Sinbad Jr." used what appears to be the exact same one. Whatever library it was, it included what are sounds from Jay Ward, Disney, Bob Clampett/Snowball Productions, Phil Kaye/TV Spots/Creston Studios, MGM (an aforementioned bullet ricco that shows up twice in "Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bunny") plus what are likely original effects. I don't know if any of the sounds here came from the Mirukami-Wolf studio, but I'm bringing it up since Harrison worked for them as sound editor prior to working for Jones. Any information regarding this library is greatly appreciated.

In the 90s, he used mostly WB effects, although sounds from other places show up as well.

One thing I've noticed is that no matter who was doing the editing, a couple of SFX always show up, namely the Road-Runner's jet sound and the bomb drops. I personally think Chuck kept these as assets, just in case he ever did do another RR cartoon.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
Toadette
2020-03-02T02:55:33Z
Originally Posted by: OutOfOdor 

After his partnership with MGM ended, Jones started using the Horta-Mahana post service, the same one Filmation used for much of its lifespan, so you start hearing lower-quality copies of Hanna-Barbera's sound effects in specials like "A Cricket in Times Square" and "The White Seal." I'd like to think that H-M did that odd PSA Jones did with Wile E. and Shamu I posted on the YT thread, but I'm not 100% positive.


Not quite....according to Howard Fein (iirc) on a post on Toonzone/old TTTP many, many years ago, Jones continued using the SIB/MGM-era SFX for a time on “Curiosity Shop”. And even this seems to have been limited only to the bridging segments; the surviving “Wizard of Id” segment produced by Format Films, for instance, uses largely Jay Ward with a smattering of H-B.

The first two Cricket in Times Square specials in 1973, meanwhile, were edited by ex-Hanna-Barbera sound editor Hank Gotzenberg (assisted by his brother(?) Ken on A Very Merry Cricket), and largely use standard-quality H-B SFX, though there are some sounds like Chester’s bouncing in the first special that I don’t think I’ve heard elsewhere. It’s with Yankee Doodle Cricket and the Jungle Book specials that Jones begins using Horta-Mahana, and even here things get rather complicated...

Besides the lower-quality (and lower-pitched) H-B SFX, a number of SFX from the SIB/MGM era began to reappear, most notably a high-pitched squeak/swish sound (which is preserved on Sound Ideas’ H-B library as a “water squirt”), as well as a Disney slide whistle that WB began using in the late 50s (it was also used by UPA in the early 60s, at least) and even some SFX that Horta may have invented himself (most notably the Star Trek “transporter energize” effect  that I recall hearing as far back as Gay Purr-ee, which credits Horta with editing, when Jaune Tom brings his claws out). I’m not certain as to how Horta got the SIB SFX, in particular—these non-H-B SFX also showed up in Filmation cartoons of the era—though the close ties SIB and Filmation had early on  could have something to do with it.

And that’s not even mentioning how Jones brought Joe Siracusa in from DFE to create the animal sounds on Yankee Doodle Cricket, and even work in tandem with Horta on Carnival of the Animals. I doubt Horta worked on that Shamu PSA, btw, the sound editing in that one is completely different from anything else Jones did at the time (and the H-B SFX aren’t low-pitched either).
OutOfOdor
2020-03-02T20:37:55Z
Thanks for the additional information, Toadette. I was actually aware of the SIB/MGM FX showing up in the 70s stuff, but for some reason initially forgot about them when I wrote that post! Guess this tells me I should've done my homework while writing this post! Sincere apologies for my history error, there.

You're probably right about the PSA not being done by Horta, I think. Incidentally, I wish I knew where that teeth chatter sound used for Wile E. came from.

I'm well aware of that Disney whistle sound being used as well, and I do know it's not the only sound from their library Treg used sometimes. I'm sure you know this, but some of the others included a quick slide whistle twirl, the cat fight, and this one sequence consisting of a slide whistle whirl, a quick smack, a spinning sound, a cymbal crash, another whistle whirl, concluding with a bell "ding!" That one, I'm pretty sure was created for "Donald Gets Drafted" (a lot of Disney sounds were created for certain scenes in their shorts), although that whirl at the beginning is absent when it plays in that cartoon. Sometimes I wonder where Treg got those Disney sounds from. Incidentally, I imagine Horta took that zip sound from UPA when he left them. More than likely.

BTW I imagine the "transporter energize" sound might've been created by Horta for UPA's sound library, but I'm not 100% sure.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
OutOfOdor
2020-03-04T20:49:30Z
A few things I somehow neglected to add to my original post regarding Jones' SFX:
-For the most part, no editors are credited during the SIB/MGM years, and I say "for the most part" because a few projects Jones worked on during this period do bear an editor credit. "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" credits Lovell Norman and John O. Young, and Norman is also credited for "Sound Editing" on the two Tom Ray-supervised cheaters "Matinee Mouse" and "Shutter-Bugged Cat." Why he gets the credit here when the other shorts Jones did for Metro don't, I have no idea. Maybe this was Tom Ray's decision? Incidentally he's also credited for editing the early CBS network shows of T&J, he more than likely did the intros and outro. Anyway, "The Pogo Birthday Special," "The Phantom Tollbooth" and "Horton Hears a Who!" credit Jim Faris, who seems to have returned to MGM after the shutdown of its cartoon department. I've little reason to doubt either of these men, especially Lovell, worked on the Tom & Jerry cartoons and possibly on the two one-shots Jones did for them.

Again, whom the editor on the SIB shorts was, I wish I knew. That excludes "Is There a Doctor in the Mouse?", because Siracusa, as I said, more than likely edited this while moonlighting from Format Films.

In terms of effects, I should've mentioned that a few H-B sounds were used in the MGM stuff, namely a recording of a jet whooshing by (heard several times for the sleigh in "Grinch") and a few quick violin zips. Oddly, their trademark car skid (known in the Sound Ideas library as the "big long skid") appears to show up in "Ah, Sweet Mouse-Story of Life" as well. "The Unshrinkable Jerry Mouse" is one, incidentally, that has a few sounds I find to be kind of out of place. Listen closely and you can hear a "bow twang" and this one rising sound that Hanna-Barbera picked up in that cartoon.

About Rich Harrison's library, I should've mentioned that a bunch of sounds H-B eventually acquired were in it, too, like that big boing used for Hugo the Abominable Snowman spanking Marvin in "Spaced Out Bunny" and a sequence consisting of timpani bounces, jew's harp boinks, a slide whistle ascending up and down, a quick whistle zip and a big "boing!" labelled "Hoyt's Boing" on the H-B library. The creepy beeps used for the robots in the Gumby short "Robot Rumpus" also ended up in this library, and I wish I knew where all those came from. All I know is that they're definitely from a stock library as a bunch of studios used them, and also the editor Phil Kaye ("Frosty the Snowman," "Roger Ramjet").

There are also a few sounds I wish I knew the definitive origin of in Harrison's library, like this one scrambling feet sound heard a couple of times in "Soup or Sonic" and this one bullet ricco known as a "mortar hit and shell scream ricco" in the H-B library that I think was used in Fleischer's Superman cartoons as well. I personally love that ricochet, but I digress. This one spacey electronic sound that's on the H-B library, referred to as the "space oscillations" were also included. There's also that weird "bwuh-bwuh-bwuh" sound, one Clokey used, also, but I doubt they originated that one.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
Pokey J.Anti-Blockhead
2020-03-05T01:06:20Z
I enjoy the topic..then there's the Paramount/"Harveytoons": ones, such as that Felishcer Sporing (after all, they were the continuation frim Fleischer), and a digging effect that sounded like a weird animal making noise (I agree with Howard Fein that it's like a chicken or cat being tortured..)..and these wound up on the offshoot Joe Oriolo Felix the Cats, which also had. aparently, their own effect, the magic bag transformation sound and a weird "ee-Honk-honoHee"-try when the Professor's money machine is starting (INSTANT MONEY,1959-60).
OutOfOdor
2020-03-15T18:14:42Z
I'm going to go out and say it: Even though I personally find Cambria Studios' New Three Stooges cartoons to be woefully rushed and mediocre, they're sort of a guilty pleasure of mine. I love the stock library music frequently used on those cartoons (courtesy Gordon Zahler's General Music library), but the sound effects also keep drawing me back to these. Not just the stock sound effects, many of which I find really, really intriguing (plus I love hearing Jay Ward SFX in anything), but the actual editing is gloriously experimental and unorthodox.

Early on the SFX editing's a lot more conventional than it will end up as the series progress. The pilot, although he's uncredited, has the earmarks of Phil Kaye's doing, including my personal Kaye effect, a metal impact/crash heard frequently in Roger Ramjet and in King Leonardo and His Short Subjects, both of which he worked on.

Unfortunately, the 155 other entires in the series didn't use Kaye's library, instead using three different SFX libraries.

The first few cartoons use a mysterious stock SFX library I really wish I had the name of, but their library consisted of a number of sounds that might've been original, along with a few sounds from a library Clokey and a few other studios used effects from, a small number effects rooted from the Disney library (a couple of sputtery car sounds, including one that's performed by some guy making all manner of silly sputters and honks and beeps that I really love, plus a distorted version of the iconic "UNNNG!" hit sound and a "springs popping out" sound originally created for Early to Bed), and a bunch of effects that are essentially variations of a few H-B/Clokey effects (that aforementioned sproing sound used in "Spaced Out Bunny", plus the "bow twang"). They also had a number of effects from UPA's sound library, plus a bunch of low-quality copies of a few of Warner Brothers' ricochet sounds and their kookaburra call, one of MGM's ricochets and even a few sounds familiar from Gene Deitch's Tom and Jerry cartoons (a couple versions of that "boi-oi-oing!" sound and an electronic zip sound [I think])

I'm not sure if Clutch Cargo and Space Angel, both also from Cambria, used this library, but I'm pretty sure Captain Fathom did

Phil Kaye and Sam Singer also used a few of the effects that were included here in this library Same with Larry Harmon Studios, but I wonder if they used this exact library sometimes, although that's unlikely (I've heard certain effects in their Popeye cartoons Cambria didn't use). Any additional information regarding this stock library is appreciated.

Starting with cartoon #7 ("There Auto Be a Law"), the Jay Ward effects start to take the place of the other sounds (plus an H-B quick whistle zip), although some of those still show up here and there. Bizarrely, episodes #16 and #24 don't use these effects, reverting to that mysterious other library for some reason. The Ward sounds start to get used less and less over time, and by episode #56, the other library starts being used more. It's during this period the sound editing starts to get weird. The cartoons start to abound in odd, unorthodox juxtapositions between sound and visual, like a piano key being used for a character dashing off, or a bunch of cartoon bass drum/cymbal crashes being used for thunder. The Jay Ward sounds still show up from time to time, with cartoon #71 ("Aloha Ha Ha") being the last to use them.

Starting with episode #74 ("Cotton Pickin' Chicken"), a modest amount of effects from the Hanna-Barbera library show up, used in tandem with the sounds from that other library. It's here that, for some reason, the editor(s) start being dependent on that set of H-B effects mostly, and making a habit of using the same effects over and over, the same car skid, slide whistle fall, H-B arrow sounds, gunshot, etc. I guess that might because they really had to bang these cartoons out, and as such they didn't have time to go through the entire library to find any other effects to use, instead making use of the same, modest number of sounds.

Strangely, episode #44 ("The 1st in Lion") uses the H-B effects as well, although Cambria was primarily using the Jay Ward effects then.

Again, I'd love to know more about that stock library used in these. If anyone knows a thing or two about it, post below if you'd like.

Incidentally, I'd like to say that it's kinda sad that I'm the only one, for the most part, posting here. I know all of you have lives, that you do more than just sit in front of a computer posting here, but I'd love to see more discussion here. Just puttin' it out there.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
OutOfOdor
2020-03-22T00:28:43Z
Has anyone else notice that these four DFE cartoons predominantly use a lot of really odd and out-of-place sounds instead of the usual WB sounds they were using during the period in which they were made?:

-Bully for Pink: The usual Warners effects, for the most part, are absent here (save for an elephant sound used frequently for the bull, and a car crash sound used when he runs through the wall instead of his entrance, heard, for instance, in Tweetie Pie when the ceiling crashes), in favor of several Hanna-Barbera effects and a few others I don't recognize, like a strange ricochet sound used for the Pink Panther dashing off at one point in the cartoon. I don't think some of these H-B sounds were ones they later started using in the 70s, like a door creak used for Fred Flintstone's garage door in one of his eponymous show's title sequences.

-Sugar and Spies: This one really intrigues me, as most of the effects here are ones DFE didn't normally use. Most I don't recognize, but there are a few sounds from the H-B library here and there, like a boing sound used for the spy car's ejector seat and a "bow twang" also heard in Bully. Oddly, as I've mentioned before, a zip sound familiar from a few of Chuck Jones' Tom and Jerry cartoons shows up when the Coyote dives behind a rock at one point in the cartoon. Plus, oddly the same WB ricochet is used over and over every time the Road Runner dashes off, which is strange considered they had a bunch of them in the library.

-That's No Lady, That's Notre Dame and Unsafe and Seine: these two use the same effects library as Spies

Plus, although the studio didn't use the Jay Ward effects much until the 70s, I've found a few odd usages of a couple of those during their 60s output:
-Pink Pistons: The classic "metal crash" sound can be heard when the Panther kicks a car at the beginning.

-Shot and Bothered: the Jay Ward timpani bounce sound is heard when Wile E. rises from a hole formed by a boulder that had just crushed him.

And even though they didn't use the H-B sounds much until 1967 or so (and even then it was usually their spinning whistle), I can't help but notice that Clippity Clobbered has a few H-B sounds in it, namely some of their ricochet sounds (plus the two that originated with Metro).

I've even found one instance of an effect that seems out of place to me being used in one of the cartoons Format Films did for DFE: a ricochet-type sound heard in a few SIB/MGM cartoons shows up in Chaser on the Rocks when Wile E. is flying about with the water hose.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
Pokey J.Anti-Blockhead
2020-04-06T15:37:59Z

Joe Oriolo's Famous FELIX THE CAT TV cartoons for Trans-Lux & Felix the Cat Productions used the Clokey computer sound,too, like Jones and Harrison did.... on the Professor's weird contraptions (A mechanical octopus, a machine to magnetically
pull in Felix's famed magic bag with the help of a metal bottle..)

In the same area, Leonardo-TTV/Gamma used that for Underdog and some others, along with the iconic "Super Chicken"/"Hoppity Hooper' (as it's most known for) Siracusa/Ward Clockwork sound on the earlier Tennesse Tuxedo and Chumley short, "BY the Plight of the Moon")

All of these New York based firms later used inferior sound mixes of Hanna-Barbera's long famous"dashing off and back" sounds (think the open to 1963's "Casper Cartoon Show"). Hal Seeger's Famous short, at least the first, and only cat version of their large forgotten character, Muggy Doo (before he somehow became a fox, as a brief supporting character to the TV "Milton the Monster', which for some reasons did very short lived backup segments, but that's another topic), used a few HB 's mixed in with the other Atlantic Coast sounds.
OutOfOdor
2020-04-22T19:25:26Z
Here's something cool that I stumbled upon once upon a time: the original release of that "BOI-OI-OING!" sound heard in numerous works of Gene Deitch: https://archive.org/details/78_boings_gbia0033752b 
This explains how it ended up getting used by companies outside of Prague, like Rankin/Bass, whom used it in Tales of the Wizard of Oz, Cambria, and even in Inspector Gadget (in the episode "Art Heist", it's used for Brain hitting a pole, really odd to hear it in a show that primarily used Hanna-Barbera sounds in its first season, but still a pleasant surprise) - it was in a stock sound effects library.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
nickramer
2020-04-24T03:42:47Z
Originally Posted by: OutOfOdor 

Here's something cool that I stumbled upon once upon a time: the original release of that "BOI-OI-OING!" sound heard in numerous works of Gene Deitch: https://archive.org/details/78_boings_gbia0033752b 
This explains how it ended up getting used by companies outside of Prague, like Rankin/Bass, whom used it in Tales of the Wizard of Oz, Cambria, and even in Inspector Gadget (in the episode "Art Heist", it's used for Brain hitting a pole, really odd to hear it in a show that primarily used Hanna-Barbera sounds in its first season, but still a pleasant surprise) - it was in a stock sound effects library.


Was this record also used for Deitch's Terrytoons as well? Some of the boings sound like the ones from "Tom Terrific".

2020-04-30T13:10:23Z
What about the Paramount Fleischer/Famous Studios sound effects from 1929 to 1967. They were pretty old, very rare, and so really hard to find these days. I'm talking about the boings, splashes, twangs, and other sound effects done by Jack Mercer, the voice of Popeye who also did the engine motor sputtering, running and whirring all the time. I know Mel Blanc did that one as well in Looney Tunes cartoons. I wonder if the Jack in the Box in the Noveltoons opening from 1943 would've had the boing sound effect when he comes out and opens the letters with a slide up harmonica sound effect that say "Noveltoon" on it? Is there anything that people might want to do to find various sound effects from the Paramount Fleischer/Famous Studios library? Where can i find them?
2020-04-30T13:10:58Z
OutOfOdor
2020-05-01T23:26:35Z
Originally Posted by: TheKingofCartoons 

What about the Paramount Fleischer/Famous Studios sound effects from 1929 to 1967. They were pretty old, very rare, and so really hard to find these days. I'm talking about the boings, splashes, twangs, and other sound effects done by Jack Mercer, the voice of Popeye who also did the engine motor sputtering, running and whirring all the time. I know Mel Blanc did that one as well in Looney Tunes cartoons. I wonder if the Jack in the Box in the Noveltoons opening from 1943 would've had the boing sound effect when he comes out and opens the letters with a slide up harmonica sound effect that say "Noveltoon" on it? Is there anything that people might want to do to find various sound effects from the Paramount Fleischer/Famous Studios library? Where can i find them?



Not all of these, unfortunately, are available on any sound library that I know of, save for a series of four boings labelled "COMEDY, ACCENT - SPROINGS," found on the International Library from Sound Ideas. You can also find some of their ricochets here: https://freesound.org/pe...raigsmith/sounds/486071/  and https://freesound.org/pe...raigsmith/sounds/486070/ 
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)
OutOfOdor
2020-05-01T23:28:49Z
Originally Posted by: nickramer 

Originally Posted by: OutOfOdor 

Here's something cool that I stumbled upon once upon a time: the original release of that "BOI-OI-OING!" sound heard in numerous works of Gene Deitch: https://archive.org/details/78_boings_gbia0033752b 
This explains how it ended up getting used by companies outside of Prague, like Rankin/Bass, whom used it in Tales of the Wizard of Oz, Cambria, and even in Inspector Gadget (in the episode "Art Heist", it's used for Brain hitting a pole, really odd to hear it in a show that primarily used Hanna-Barbera sounds in its first season, but still a pleasant surprise) - it was in a stock sound effects library.


Was this record also used for Deitch's Terrytoons as well? Some of the boings sound like the ones from "Tom Terrific".



Not from what I've checked so far. If I do come across a Terrytoon with any of them I'll edit this post.
"With all respect to the great mousetrap."- Popeye, "The Spinach Overture" (1935)