DudleyDud
2024-03-18T07:27:44Z
While Bill Nolan had been a major player in the early days of animation, particularly in the '20s, the artist seems to have fallen from grace from the mid '30s onwards, without anyone really knowing why.

First of all, Nolan was abruptly dismissed from the Lantz studio in 1934 by Universal executives, a rather surprising decision considering that Nolan had directed some of the best films in the Oswald series, the masterful cartoon "The Merry Old Soul" even having been nominated for an animation Oscar. After his dismissal, Bill was unable to regain the directing position he had held at Lantz, and was demoted to the rank of simple animator for Colombia and MGM animation studios. But Bill Nolan really hit rock bottom when he was hired at Fleischer Studios in Miami, where he was surrounded by assistants who butchered his hitherto distinctive work, constantly seeking to retouch his drawings to make them conform more closely to the more realistic style of late '30s cartoons.

How can we explain the decline of Bill Nolan's career in just a few years?
Jimmy Two Shoes
2024-03-21T20:38:34Z
The mid-1930s was a pivotal period in the history of animation, as the power of the Disney studio became increasingly overwhelming over other cartoon studios, with enormous repercussions that would definitively change the future of animation.

Film producers began pressuring animators to make slavish copies of Disney cartoons, with truly catastrophic consequences, as virtually all animation studios were forced to abandon their distinctive artistic styles in favor of bland imitations of Disney cartoons.

This situation was exacerbated by Walt Disney's desire to put an end to the rubber-hose style of animation in cartoons, on the utterly stupid pretext that realistic animation would make cartoons more credible to the public.

Under these conditions, an animator like Bill Nolan, who was the creator of rubber-hose animation and had a very personal drawing style, had no chance of surviving in the animation field without totally submitting to the new rules imposed by Disney on the world of animation.
nickramer
2024-03-24T14:32:17Z
I thought it was because Nolan had a fall-out with Lantz.
Jimmy Two Shoes
2024-03-26T22:30:41Z
In his article on Manuel Moreno and Bill Nolan, Tom Klein says that Nolan was fired from the studio because his salary was considered too high.
It would appear that he nevertheless maintained good relations with Walter Lantz after his departure from the studio.

https://cartoonresearch....l-moreno-and-bill-nolan/ 

DudleyDud
2024-03-30T22:28:03Z
Originally Posted by: nickramer 

I thought it was because Nolan had a fall-out with Lantz.



Where did you read that?
I've always read that Nolan was forced to resign because Universal executives thought his salary was too high, as has just been mentioned.
nickramer
2024-03-31T14:32:57Z
Err....... I just only assumed that.... Why do I always end up putting my foot in my mouth?
DudleyDud
2024-04-01T08:50:41Z
Originally Posted by: nickramer 

Err....... I just only assumed that.... Why do I always end up putting my foot in my mouth?



It's no big deal, I think you've simply confused this event with the dispute between Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks.
nickramer
2024-04-01T14:23:47Z
Being a Disney fan, I don't confuse that fallout with anything.