Jason Todd
2017-12-22T10:02:18Z
I'm fairly new to the group of cartoon fans that buy Thunderbean's DVDs and Blu-rays, and I've been curious about the sources which Mr. Stanchfield and his team typically restore from. Have they ever restored a cartoon from its original camera negative, or do they usually just use whatever copies (be it sixteen or thirty-five millimeter fine grain or nitrate prints) they have access to?
bort
  • bort
  • Advanced Member
2017-12-22T11:26:56Z
The public domain and "special" discs are typically transferred from old 16/35mm prints that Steve finds. Sometimes these are taken from old 16mm home movie re-releases (Castle Films or Official Films). Other times, he is able to get well-preserved original elements though a licensing agreement with an external collection (e.g. Blackhawk Films), resulting in transfers that look really great (such as the Private Snafu and Willie Whopper sets).

I believe the transfers themselves are typically done on a Shadow Telecine attached to a Da Vinci 2K color corrector, at a company called Ringside Creative in Michigan.
Steve Stanchfield
2017-12-24T15:05:04Z
Originally Posted by: bort 

The public domain and "special" discs are typically transferred from old 16/35mm prints that Steve finds. Sometimes these are taken from old 16mm home movie re-releases (Castle Films or Official Films). Other times, he is able to get well-preserved original elements though a licensing agreement with an external collection (e.g. Blackhawk Films), resulting in transfers that look really great (such as the Private Snafu and Willie Whopper sets).

I believe the transfers themselves are typically done on a Shadow Telecine attached to a Da Vinci 2K color corrector, at a company called Ringside Creative in Michigan.



Thanks Bort! You've made my life easy and got a good amount of the details already!

A good amount of the time we do take stuff to Ringside here; they've got a really good Shadow that's really like a Spirit (that's doing true HD\, having been souped up beyond the usual specs). We also do scans in 2k and 4k/ 5k for many of the films now, and we generally do those scans on a Lasergraphics scanner. Those scans have astonishing quality, and that was we can give a digital master back to the archives in film quality. It's also more expensive, and I have to travel to do them... so Detroit is good for a lot of reasons, although not too many people are doing Telecine around here these days.

These days, generally, if we're working from 35mm camera neg for an archive, it's almost always scanned by us in 5k, handling the Nitrate and working with the archive. We're going through elements at the archives and determining the best material to scan, often scanning multiple copies to get the most complete and best results.

If you have any other questions I'll always try to answer!
Jason Todd
2017-12-25T10:13:41Z
Thank you, Steve! And I must say, as a young fan/collector of classic animated material, I really appreciate you continuing to restore and release cartoons that the rest of society no longer has any interest in.