kazblox
  • kazblox
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
2016-01-16T07:20:23Z
I know, I know, It's petty of a thread like this for a very minor question, and a few people who know animators at Fleischer and Famous (like Jerry Beck) might be the only people to answer it, but what the heck, I'm going to make it anyway:

Who were the cel artists that drew the many variations of them? I'm curious because as far as I know, these logos were exclusive to the Fleischer / Famous cartoon productions, and no other Paramount films used these logos. Not even the Puppetoons used them.

(The picture album is too big to post here so I'll post an imgur collection link.)
https://imgur.com/a/0Me6x 
Kretes96
2016-01-16T18:27:27Z
Originally Posted by: kazblox 

🅱I'm curious because as far as I know, these logos were exclusive to the Fleischer / Famous cartoon productions, and no other Paramount films used these logos. Not even the Puppetoons used them.


Ever funnier thing is that the 30s-50s international foreign prints of Fleischer/Famous didn't have those logos, but instead got stranger versions of Paramount logo, like this ending one from a French print of "Play Safe" (I don't know how the opening Paramount logo for French version of this short looked like, because this print of "Play Safe" had the opening Paramount 1937 logo from "Chicken a La King" (along with music):
UserPostedImage

The original version probably ended with this closing logo (given the short's release date):
UserPostedImage
kazblox
  • kazblox
  • Advanced Member Topic Starter
2016-02-08T23:30:17Z
Originally Posted by: Kretes96 


Ever funnier thing is that the 30s-50s international foreign prints of Fleischer/Famous didn't have those logos, but instead got stranger versions of Paramount logo, like this ending one from a French print of "Play Safe"


Off-topic note:
An even funnier thing is that the French print you're talking does a little odd editing.

In a 16mm UM&M transfer I have in my hands, the little boy in the opening pulls the lever then a tiny train goes over him. In the publicly available French print from online, the same scene is spliced in reverse. The train goes over him and then he pulls the lever. And then the scene is repeated again in the correct order.