Tiger Trouble
Studio: Disney Release Date : January 5, 1945 Series: Goofy Cartoon
  1. General Info

Cumulative rating:       (1 rating submitted)

Synopsis

Tiger hunting in Africa with Goofy as a reluctant Great White Hunter.

Characters

Goofy

Credits

Director

Jack Kinney

Animator

Milt Kahl
John Sibley
Eric Larson
Jack Boyd

Story

Bill Peet

Music

Paul Smith (I)

Backgrounds

Claude Coats

Layout

Lance Nolley

Producer

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney

Included in:

Holiday for Henpecked Husbands

Television

Mickey Mouse Tracks (Season 1, Episode 61)

Video Information

VHS

United States

Cartoon Classics : First Series : Volume 8 : Sport Goofy's Vacation

Germany

Donald Duck's Ferienabenteuer
Goofy und Pluto Total Verrückt
Goofy Präsentiert

France

Mickey, Donald, Pluto et Dingo en Vacances

Italy

Come Divertirsti Con Paperino & C.
Le Avventure di Caccia del Prof. de Paperis
Winnie Puh Orsetto Ghiottone
Video Parade 18

Laserdisc (CLV)

United States

Cartoon Classics : Limited Gold Editions II : From Pluto with Love

Japan

The Three Caballeros
Let's Relax
Disney Cartoon Festival 7
Mickey's Jungle Trouble
The Hunting Instinct

DVD

United States

The Complete Goofy
It's a Small World of Fun - Volume 3

Germany

Disney Treasures : Wave 2 : The Complete Goofy

United Kingdom

Disney Treasures : Wave 2 : The Complete Goofy

Sweden

Disney Treasures : Wave 2 : The Complete Goofy

Technical Specifications

MPAA No.: 9974
Running time: 7:37
Animation Type: Standard (Hand-drawn-Cel) Animation
Aspect Ratio: 1.37 : 1
Color Type: Technicolor
Sound Type: Mono: RCA Sound Recording
Print Type: 35mm
Negative Type: 35mm
Cinematographic Format: Spherical
Original Language: English

Reviews and Comments

From Ryan :

This short appears to feature Delores the elephant who was in the The Big Wash. I enjoy this short. I find the part where the tiger loses his stripes to be quite humorous.

From Baruch Weiss :

I love this cartoon, I noticed that in the scene where goofy is trapped in the tigers den Paul J. Smith used the same music from Cured Duck also in the chase sequence the same music was heard later in the 1953 cartoon Rugged Bear briefly when Humphrey changes the station, also Bill Peet is credited with the story, but my version on "The Complete Goofy" has it misspelled Bill Peed.

From Dino Cencia :

As I read Baruch Weiss's comment, I agree with him. The part when the tiger jumped on Goofy and licked his foot, and Goofy tied the tiger's tail to a tree; I heard that same music from Cured Duck when Donald Duck was smoking a cigar going to Daisy Duck's house. As I heard that music again in this cartoon, I thought, isn't that the same music from Cured Duck? I was right and I loved that music. Also, the chase music part was from another Donald and Goofy cartoon Frank Duck Brings em' Back Alive. I heard that music too and I love Disney cartoon music. The funny part in Tiger Trouble was when the tiger was chasing Goofy around the jungle. I like Goofy cartoons and I'm going to Disneyland tomorrow! Yay! I can't wait to see all the characters! Great Goofy cartoon! 120 out of 120.

From Brad Bethel :

This is tied with Hockey Homicide for the funniest Goofy short ever. Even the menacing title has me laughing before the fun begins.

The success of this cartoon comes from the creative use of sound and vocal effects (Goofy's yelling and the tiger roaring), wild animation (the chase thru the jungle), and as a whole, Jack Kinney's ability to weave so much fun and humor (Dolores' rhythmic tiger tracking) in what was set up as a dangerous expedition.

From Bryan Hensley :

I've been told these days that tiger hunting in India is outlawed. Probably because tigers are endangered species, especially Bengal Tigers! This is still a hilarious Goofy short! When the elephant toots "LUNCH!", it sounded a lot like the whistle from the 1933 short Building A Building. This short was featured in Disney's It's A Small World of Fun volume 3; the disc and the cover! The scene where Goofy scratches his way through the jungle looks as if it was reused from Lonesome Ghosts in 1937! Never mess with an animal who loves to eat people, such as the tiger in this short! The part where the tiger held Goofy with his teeth into his den seems partly-redone in Goliath II in 1960. (When Raja carries Goliath off by his tail!) The tiger's running was also redone for Raja in that short! The tiger losing his stripes must have been so good, that also happened to Tigger for Winnie the Pooh at least twice in 1988 and 2004! This short is one doozy of a Goofy short; I hope all of you go nuts over it too!

From Klaus Disney :

German Title: Die Tigerjagd

From ToonStar95 :

This is one of my favorite classic Disney shorts. I praise it not only for its humor, but also the animation that makes it work, especially the climactic chase sequence that contains shades of Avery.
See all comments by ToonStar95

From Ryan Kilpatrick at The Disney Film Project :

Ah, Goofy. The loveable loser who does just about anything, and never does it well, returns in Tiger Trouble. This is the first short of 1945, and it continues a well worn path of having Goofy demonstrate a “skill” while the narrator opines about the proper way of doing things.

While Tiger Trouble is not necessarily a “how to” short, it still follows the same procedures. The subtle difference here is that the narrator is talking about the wonders of hunting a tiger, without specifically referring to what Goofy is doing or instructing him on how to do it. Does that little change make a difference? Yes, if only because Goofy is not interacting with the audience through the narrator, but instead with the other characters in the short.

Goofy’s sidekick in this escapade, then, becomes not the audience or the narrator, but the elephant he rides. The elephant takes on characteristics more like a dog, and provides some great comedy. Take for instance when Goofy and the elephant stop for a picnic, and the scene is set more like a nice countryside afternoon than a jungle safari. The elephant sits up nice and proper to consume the picnic lunch.

The tiger is an interesting character as well. The look of the tiger doesn’t call to mind famous Disney cats like Shere Khan in The Jungle Book, but instead more comedic and cartoony. He reminded me more of Snaggletooth from the Hanna Barbera cartoons than anything I’d expect from Disney.

Some funny gags come from the confrontation between Goofy and the tiger, including some fun uses of off camera action. When Goofy gets dragged into the bushes, we get to hear the tiger thrash him about, then see Goofy thrown out in the midst of the jungle before getting dragged back inside. It’s a silly gag, but one that’s used to great effect.

The end result of the short comes up with some nice new characters in the tiger and the elephant, but not a lot of great bits from Goofy. It’s a funny short, but could have been a Donald short just as easily. There’s not a real reason to have the Goof here, but it’s always good to see him just the same.


From Skeetches :

I love this cartoon. The characters are funny (especially the elephant) the backgrounds have just enough details in them and they're coloured beautifully.

Donald Duck cartoons of this time I found weren't paid much attention to in the background department. Similar to Carl Bark's take in the comics, background details were given much attention.

All-in-all, not the best "Goofy" cartoon, but stylistically and humor wise, top notch.


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Screenshots

Submitted by eutychus


History

5/10/2012

  • Home video info added by eutychus

7/23/2013

  • Tech specs added by eutychus

8/1/2013

  • Television info added by eutychus

1/23/2014

  • Home video info added by eutychus

8/29/2014

  • Animation type added by eutychus
  • Color type added by eutychus
  • Sound type added by eutychus

3/7/2016

  • Comments added
  • ToonStar95

6/14/2017

  • Credits added by kintutoons32

Sources

Jack Kinney: Director
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Milt Kahl: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

John Sibley: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Eric Larson: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Jack Boyd: Animator
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Bill Peet: Story
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Lance Nolley: Layout
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Claude Coats: Backgrounds
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Paul Smith (I): Music
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney: Producer
  • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)