A primer on frame rates - Forum.
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WaltWiz1901  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, January 31, 2018 10:55:51 AM(UTC)
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On another thread, I (noticed that - and consequently,) helped with - everybody on the thread (was) derailing the main topic and arguing about frame rates. Since that thread has since been closed and there seems to be no other place here to discuss them any further, I decided to list some anecdotes about each frame rate and how they "work".

-Film: 24 frames-per-second
Prior to the invention of sound film, many silent movies and shorts are documented to have (also) ran at the slower 18fps. There are two setbacks with releasing and restoring them properly; silent films are frequently restored at the more common 24fps (and they, for the most part, look like they're at the right speed even at that rate), while neither rate can be accurately encoded on home media (even though they, for the most part, will move like they were "encoded" that way).
-NTSC: 23.976 frames-per-second (progressive), 29.97fps (interlaced)
While progressively scanned and stored on disc at roughly 23.97fps (a very close approximation to the 24fps of film), the contents of a NTSC home video format are played back at the more commonly-documented 30fps. Because of this, while film can be stored on a NTSC DVD at a speed similar to its native 24fps, it will be up-converted to 30fps on playback.
-PAL: 25 frames-per-second
As a result of the noticeably faster frame rate of this particular format, when played in PAL, both film and NTSC are played at both a higher pitch and (obviously) speed. This process is commonly referred to as "PAL speedup"; about the only advantage PAL has over NTSC is its resolution - 625 lines of resolution as opposed to NTSC's 525.

Edited by user Friday, April 6, 2018 4:07:05 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

ToonStar95  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, January 31, 2018 11:18:02 AM(UTC)
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I heard that some of the shorts in the first Looney Tunes Golden Collection (like "Bully for Bugs", "Rabbit of Seville" and "Rabbit Fire") are low-toned because WB took the soundtracks from PAL prints and toned them down an octave, but those select prints were already down to the NTSC tone.
User is suspended until 6/14/2292 4:56:53 PM(UTC) LuckyToon  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 31, 2018 12:23:34 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: ToonStar95 Go to Quoted Post
I heard that some of the shorts in the first Looney Tunes Golden Collection (like "Bully for Bugs", "Rabbit of Seville" and "Rabbit Fire") are low-toned because WB took the soundtracks from PAL prints and toned them down an octave, but those select prints were already down to the NTSC tone.


That's true, and there were actually only 8 remastered cartoons on the first volume that were low pitched due to the use of the PAL prints that kept the original NTSC pitch.
  • High Diving Hare (1949)
  • Bully for Bugs (1953)
  • Rabbit of Seville (1950)
  • Golden Yeggs (1950)
  • Rabbit Fire (1951)
  • Awful Orphan (1949)
  • Kit for Cat (1948)
  • Early to Bet (1951)
Toonatic  
#4 Posted : Thursday, February 1, 2018 2:40:48 AM(UTC)
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Rabbit of Seville's audio pitch was corrected for The Essential Bugs Bunny, but then the low-pitched version was used again for the Platinum Collection.

Speaking of low-pitch, another example is The Pink Panther short Dial P For Pink which presented at low-pitch and runs a little bit slower on the Kino release. The MGM release presents the short in its original pitch and speed.

By the by, I won't rest until that error is corrected.
WaltWiz1901  
#5 Posted : Thursday, February 1, 2018 9:02:52 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Toonatic Go to Quoted Post
Rabbit of Seville's audio pitch was corrected for The Essential Bugs Bunny, but then the low-pitched version was used again for the Platinum Collection.

Speaking of low-pitch, another example is The Pink Panther short Dial P For Pink which presented at low-pitch and runs a little bit slower on the Kino release. The MGM release presents the short in its original pitch and speed.

By the by, I won't rest until that error is corrected.

On another thread, someone who worked on the Kino Pink Panther set stated the copy you compared the apparent frame rate error to there was a time-compressed, or PAL, print. The frame rate of the print used on the MGM DVD is too fast, because according to that thread, the short is indeed running at the correct speed on Blu-ray.
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