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Pokey J.Anti-Blockhead  
#21 Posted : Friday, February 17, 2017 6:07:35 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: speedy fast Go to Quoted Post

Recently I've noticed that in cartoons with Henery Hawk, the character tends to have happy endings. We never actually see him cook Foghorn Leghorn (and he's alive and well in the next cartoon, but the cartoons don't follow continuity), but the cartoons do typically end with him dragging his intended prey home to cook/eat. Interesting that the majority of cartoons with a predator character end with him being able to cook his prey. The same can also be said about the weasel.

Which reminds me that, back when I was a kid, I saw Foghorn Leghorn as the good guy and wondered why so many of his cartoons had unhappy endings for him (though some do - Crowing Pains, Raw Raw Rooster, Fox Terror, The High and the Flighty). I thought "good guys" always had to have happy endings. Of course I saw him as the good guy because he was the star (Henery Hawk was the star at first, but that was lost on me when I saw the early cartoons).

And recently it's occurred to me that so many Foghorn Leghorn cartoons co-star a small character. There's recurring characters like Henery Hawk, Egghead Jr, and the weasel (and I guess Miss Prissy also counts as a small character), not to mention the worm from A Fractured Leghorn, the small rooster from Fox Terror, the boxer from Sock-A-Doodle-Doo, the kid from The Slick Chick, the ostrich from Mother Was a Rooster, the rooster from Broken Leghorn, and the beatnik from Banty Raids.


I always noted all of what you said, and also, Chuck Jones never used Beaky Buzzard, Cecil Turtle, the Goofy Gophers or Speedy Gonzales, but then for the Gophers he already had some crafty rodents,l Hubie and Bertie, b efore the gophers appeared, and as for Speedy, Jones had his own speedy critter, the Road Runner, and again before Speedy came along.

Similiar, Warren Foster wrote for Freleng, Clampett, Tashlin, and McKimsdon before leaving for Hanna-Barbera and joined by Mike Maltese, but Foster never wrote for Jones or Avery.
speedy fast  
#22 Posted : Friday, February 17, 2017 1:24:36 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Pokey J.Anti-Blockhead Go to Quoted Post


I always noted all of what you said, and also, Chuck Jones never used Beaky Buzzard, Cecil Turtle, the Goofy Gophers or Speedy Gonzales, but then for the Gophers he already had some crafty rodents,l Hubie and Bertie, b efore the gophers appeared, and as for Speedy, Jones had his own speedy critter, the Road Runner, and again before Speedy came along.



Additionally, Cecile Turtle must be one of the few characters who was never directed by the same director twice. His first cartoon was directed by Tex Avery, his second by Bob Clampett, and his third by Friz Freling. And I've recently realized that each prior director was no longer involved with Warner Bros. before Cecile's next appearance (gee, if Freling left or was let go around that time, would we have seen a fourth Cecile Turtle cartoon...?).
speedy fast  
#23 Posted : Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:23:11 AM(UTC)
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There have been two VHS releases themed around Mel Blanc, A Salute to Mel Blanc and The Vocal Genius. I wonder how the cartoon selections were chosen. After all, a Mel Blanc compilation feels a lot more random than a compilation themed around a character or director. With a character or director, even if they have a large filmography, it's not as big as the amount of cartoons Mel Blanc's voice is heard in, so there's still a lot less to choose from. Mel Blanc only did voices, he wasn't involved with creativity such as writing or directing. There's not many WB shorts from between, say, 1940 and 1967 (maybe I should have gone a little higher than 1940) that do not feature his voice, and there's many where he does all the voices.

A Mel Blanc release might as well be titled "all stars" or be an honorary volume of The Looney Tunes Video Show. It would be interesting to know how the contents of those two videos were chosen. Sometimes I wonder if Blanc, Chuck Jones, and Friz Freling selected the contents for their respective "Salute to...." videos (but if they did, would it have been noted on the box somewhere?). For years I thought it was strange that there was no "Salute to Robert McKimson", wondering if maybe it was because he was dead while the others were alive, and if they selected contents for their own videos, this would be a good reason to not do a Robert McKimson video (of course there's also the fact that McKimson's more underrated and not a "name" like the others).
nickramer  
#24 Posted : Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:37:20 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: speedy fast Go to Quoted Post

There have been two VHS releases themed around Mel Blanc, A Salute to Mel Blanc and The Vocal Genius. I wonder how the cartoon selections were chosen. After all, a Mel Blanc compilation feels a lot more random than a compilation themed around a character or director. With a character or director, even if they have a large filmography, it's not as big as the amount of cartoons Mel Blanc's voice is heard in, so there's still a lot less to choose from. Mel Blanc only did voices, he wasn't involved with creativity such as writing or directing. There's not many WB shorts from between, say, 1940 and 1967 (maybe I should have gone a little higher than 1940) that do not feature his voice, and there's many where he does all the voices.



I wouldn't know, but I do know that Jerry Beck chose the cartoons for "The Vocal Genius" (and all the other Columbia House Looney Tune tapes). You might want to ask him on how he chose the selection.
speedy fast  
#25 Posted : Sunday, February 19, 2017 1:20:27 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: nickramer Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: speedy fast Go to Quoted Post

There have been two VHS releases themed around Mel Blanc, A Salute to Mel Blanc and The Vocal Genius. I wonder how the cartoon selections were chosen. After all, a Mel Blanc compilation feels a lot more random than a compilation themed around a character or director. With a character or director, even if they have a large filmography, it's not as big as the amount of cartoons Mel Blanc's voice is heard in, so there's still a lot less to choose from. Mel Blanc only did voices, he wasn't involved with creativity such as writing or directing. There's not many WB shorts from between, say, 1940 and 1967 (maybe I should have gone a little higher than 1940) that do not feature his voice, and there's many where he does all the voices.



I wouldn't know, but I do know that Jerry Beck chose the cartoons for "The Vocal Genius" (and all the other Columbia House Looney Tune tapes). You might want to ask him on how he chose the selection.


I knew that Jerry Beck (and others) picked the selections for Looney Tunes: The Collectors Edition. According to The Bugs Bunny Video Guide, Beck planned to have the line be very appealing for collectors, but then Warner Bros. had a team of people make changes to his suggested line-up, making the line-ups feel more like they were picked by committee.

The Bugs Bunny Video Guide mentions that Beck had different ideas than what came out, I wonder if he wrote down what he wanted, it'd be great if he could reveal what could have been. I also keep thinking, since he has said that he thought up plans for ten Golden Collections, it'd be great if he could reveal his intended line-ups before changes were made. I know volume 2 had a Road Runner and a Tweety disc because Warner Bros. demanded it (would we have gotten just one of those otherwise? or neither?), and I have a feeling that the last volume would have been different if they didn't know it was going to be the last volume (though I don't doubt we would have gotten at least one of those discs on volume 6). Though The Bugs Bunny Video Guide also says that he thought up the line-ups in his head. Not sure if the guides right or wrong on that (did Beck ever say anywhere that he did think up disc themes/a line-up in his head as opposed to writing it all down?).
speedy fast  
#26 Posted : Wednesday, March 1, 2017 12:57:07 PM(UTC)
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One thing I've noticed recently is that in the original opening credits for A Wild Hare, the music that plays is Wild About Harry. Perhaps a pun, given the similar titles for both the short and the song (as "Wild" appears in both titles and some variant of "hair").
LuckyToon  
#27 Posted : Saturday, March 4, 2017 4:35:13 PM(UTC)
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I do feel that it's a shame WB back in the 50's had to sell their black & whites and pre-1948 libraries to different companies at that time (before they got back the rights to those cartoon libraries in 1967 for the pre-1943 black & white cartoons, and in 1996 for the pre-1948 cartoons) since I do regard them as the best Looney Tunes cartoons besides the post-1948 cartoons.
Blob55  
#28 Posted : Saturday, March 11, 2017 4:22:41 AM(UTC)
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I wish that the rest of the LTMMs would come out on some kind of device. :/
User is suspended until 10/18/2045 7:30:21 AM(UTC) ParamountCartoons  
#29 Posted : Sunday, March 12, 2017 8:55:06 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: LuckyToon Go to Quoted Post
I do feel that it's a shame WB back in the 50's had to sell their black & whites and pre-1948 libraries to different companies at that time (before they got back the rights to those cartoon libraries in 1967 for the pre-1943 black & white cartoons, and in 1996 for the pre-1948 cartoons) since I do regard them as the best Looney Tunes cartoons besides the post-1948 cartoons.



I also find it too bad that Paramount sold their cartoons to UM&M and Harvey.....
speedy fast  
#30 Posted : Sunday, March 12, 2017 11:51:11 AM(UTC)
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I often think about how many of the really iconic Warner Bros. shorts were not even nominated for an Oscar, while many of the ones that were nominated (especially some of the wins) feel more like random, ordinary animated shorts. Many of the Oscar-nominees/winners aren't bad, but they don't seem to be the masterpieces that shorts such as Duck Amuck, Duck Dodgers, What's Opera, Doc?, One Froggy Evening, Porky in Wackyland, or the hunters trilogy (among others) are.

TV Tropes has a page called "Seinfeld is Unfunny", for things that were innovative at the time but since then have had so many imitators that modern viewers might not see what the big deal is. I wonder if the many Oscar-nominated/winning Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts would belong there, especially since many of the character shorts occurred early in the lives of certain characters. Then again, could it be that the academy preferred new characters, considering how many one-shots were nominated (though with the exception of So Much for So Little, which probably shouldn't count, all of them featured a recurring character).

The debuts of Bugs Bunny, Foghorn Leghorn, and Sylvester were all nominated for Oscars, while early appearances by Pepe le Pew, Elmer Fudd, and Speedy Gonzales were also nominated, as was the first team-up between Sylvester and Tweety. The Pepe le Pew and Speedy Gonzales cartoons in question won and set the formula for later cartoons with those characters. The first two Pepe cartoons had a similar enough formula while also being a bit different (with Pepe chasing after a male cat in the first and a Chihuahua in the second), while Speedy's Oscar-winning short was his first team-up with Sylvester, though while For Scent-Imental Reasons set the standard Pepe le Pew formula (with Penelope being the regular victin), the formula borrowed by Speedy Gonzales wasn't used in too many later Speedy cartoons, but was still used a fair bit (and I don't think any of the later Oscar nominated Speedy cartoons reused that plot).

In fact, of all the iconic long-running Looney Tunes main cast, Daffy Duck is the only character to have NEVER appeared in an Oscar-nominated shorts (and many of the Looney Tunes shorts I most associate as among the most iconic feature Daffy). Most of the Oscar-nominated cartoons with the characters came early in their lives, likely ensuring that they would return. Now that I think about it, have any characters with a really small filmography (let's say about five cartoons or less?) star in any Oscar-nominees? Of course Walky Tawky Hawky was nominated and led to more Foghorn Leghorn cartoons, with the rooster making his debut there, but Henery Hawk had already been in a cartoon or two, and his solo career wouldn't really last much longer, while the Foghorn series would feature Henery less and less (I think there was a long gap between the characters last two appearances).

Of course there have been Oscar-nominated/Oscar-winning cartoons with characters that came long after they were introduced. Knighty Knight Bugs came nearly two decades after the wabbit's first appearance (and nearly 15 years after the debut of Yosemite Sam). Sylvester has starred in the highest number of Oscar-winning cartoons with three winners, one with Speedy (in his second appearance) and two with Tweety, which came out almost ten years apart. Additionally, there was another Oscar-nominated Sylvester and Tweety team-up, Sandy Claws, while a number of Speedy Gonzales cartoons were nominated throughout the 1950s, the one Oscar-nominated Porky Pig cartoon came almost a decade after his debut, and the Oscar-nominated Beep Prepared came nearly 12 years after the first Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoon. So the Oscar-nominees are not entirely exclusive to early appearances before the characters became stars.

Of the five Oscar-winning Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts, I feel like Birds Anonymous is the only really iconic one, and the one that I like the best. Tweetie Pie is okay but not something I consider the best of Sylvester, Tweety, Friz Freling, or Looney Tunes (would I like it better if there weren't very many further team-ups between Tweety and Sylvester?). For Scent-Imental Reasons and Speedy Gonzales are among the most available cartoons of those characters, as they tend to be the one cartoon with their respective characters to be on "all-stars"-type video releases and in Looney Tunes marathons (with Speedy Gonzales being one of the more frequently-broadcast Speedy cartoons during the period when Cartoon Network rarely showed the character, though that one seemed to be shown more in big Looney Tunes marathons while Cat-Tails for Two and The Wild Chase seemed to be the most frequently shown during regular programming). I do think that For Scent-Imental Reason is one of the best Pepe le Pew cartoons (there's not too many that I REALLY like) while Speedy Gonzales is one of my favorite Oscar-winning cartoons (but in terms of Speedy Gonzales cartoons, there's a lot that I like a lot better), and Knighty Knight Bugs seems like a very random choice of a Bugs Bunny cartoon to be nominated, yet alone win (and I feel like it's the least broadcast/available of these shorts).
nickramer  
#31 Posted : Sunday, March 12, 2017 12:01:32 PM(UTC)
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There were some lists that some film organizations archived that list films that each animated studios submitted for "Best Animated Short" to the Academy for consideration including ones that didn't make it to the final list. Jerry Beck has done some posts about each list on "Cartoon Research" (and I think I recall that he did one on "Cartoon Brew" about the 1954 shorts a long time ago). He hasn't done any in while, though.

Edited by user Sunday, March 12, 2017 12:09:56 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

speedy fast  
#32 Posted : Monday, March 13, 2017 11:03:17 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: nickramer Go to Quoted Post
There were some lists that some film organizations archived that list films that each animated studios submitted for "Best Animated Short" to the Academy for consideration including ones that didn't make it to the final list. Jerry Beck has done some posts about each list on "Cartoon Research" (and I think I recall that he did one on "Cartoon Brew" about the 1954 shorts a long time ago). He hasn't done any in while, though.


I had never thought about the possibility that some of the best shorts could have been submitted for consideration (or "nominated to be nominated"), or they they could have submitted more Bugs Bunny shorts, or some Daffy Duck shorts.
osoul  
#33 Posted : Tuesday, March 14, 2017 6:04:03 AM(UTC)
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I have to say that all Oscar winning Looney Tunes suck except for Birds Anonymous, which is fantastic.

I don't know what could have been the appeal in dull shorts like Knighty Knight Bugs, Speedy Gonzales or Tweetie Pie. I dont't think there were any, just some inner politics that had been forgotten since then. Aged jokes can be found in shorts like Baby Bottleneck, A Gruesome Twosome or even Porky Pig's Feat (these are still regarded highly despite their forgotten references), but the tired, pedestrian Oscar winners didn't have any (unless we count weak racial stereotype gags)... I guess Knighty got it just because the Academy felt ashamed that they ignored Bugs despite his huge and popular filmography. Most of the nominees were dull as well... Sandy Claws, Pied Piper of Guadelupe, really?

I also think Robert McKimson felt betrayed when Hillbilly Hare wasn't even nominated. He was salty as Dead Sea in his sole interview that this toon was snubbed back then. That could explain why his cartoons after that went downhill so quickly.
nickramer  
#34 Posted : Tuesday, March 14, 2017 10:13:56 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: osoul Go to Quoted Post
I have to say that all Oscar winning Looney Tunes suck except for Birds Anonymous, which is fantastic.

I don't know what could have been the appeal in dull shorts like Knighty Knight Bugs, Speedy Gonzales or Tweetie Pie. I dont't think there were any, just some inner politics that had been forgotten since then. Aged jokes can be found in shorts like Baby Bottleneck, A Gruesome Twosome or even Porky Pig's Feat (these are still regarded highly despite their forgotten references), but the tired, pedestrian Oscar winners didn't have any (unless we count weak racial stereotype gags)... I guess Knighty got it just because the Academy felt ashamed that they ignored Bugs despite his huge and popular filmography. Most of the nominees were dull as well... Sandy Claws, Pied Piper of Guadelupe, really?

I disagree there as I was also disappointed that neither "Tweetie Pie" nor "For Scentimental Reason" ( and Pepe in general) didn't make it to the "100 Greatest Looney Tunes" book. Heck, the former was even in the back section in the "50 Greatest Cartoons" book! I think I even recall that I nominated them for the "100" a long time ago on "Cartoon Brew".

Quote:
I also think Robert McKimson felt betrayed when Hillbilly Hare wasn't even nominated. He was salty as Dead Sea in his sole interview that this toon was snubbed back then. That could explain why his cartoons after that went downhill so quickly.

I wouldn't go that far.

Edited by user Tuesday, March 14, 2017 10:40:21 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

speedy fast  
#35 Posted : Wednesday, March 15, 2017 11:52:06 AM(UTC)
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While I feel most of the Oscar winners and nominees are not as good as the many shorts that weren't nominated, I wouldn't say they were all dull (well, maybe So Much for So Little, but that's a different kind of short). Even my least favorite of the Oscar winners have some good things (though I can't say off-hand what).

In the late-1990s, there was a collection of videos spotlighting a recently-released short and some related classic cartoons. I wonder what would have been included if all of the '90s cartoons (and perhaps The Duxorcist and Night of the Living Duck) spotlighted their own releases (well, probably a lot of repeats from the Golden Jubilee series).

If Pullet Surprise got its own release, then that would have given Foghorn Leghorn his second compilation (though I wouldn't be surprised if it was mostly a retread of Foghorn Leghorn's Fractured Funnies plus Little Boy Boo from A Salute to Mel Blanc), a Father of the Bird video could have given Sylvester his own compilation without having to share billing with Tweety (I think A Mouse Divided and some Sylvester Jr. shorts would have been appropriate for the release). Videos spotlighting Box Office Bunny and Blooper Bunny would have most likely been more movie-themed/behind the scenes cartoons (or maybe just additional Bugs Bunny compilations... Or maybe one of them could have been a Bugs, Daffy, and Elmer compilation; a line-up I have in mind is: Box Office Bunny/Blooper Bunny, A Star is Bored, The Abominable Snow Rabbit, Bugs' Bonnets, Quack Shot, and one of the hunters trilogy). I wonder what an Another Froggy Evening video would have been comprised of - musical shorts (if they all had to be from the Golden Jubilee collection, my picks would be The Rabbit of Seville, High Note, What's Opera, Doc?, Long-Haired Hair, and One Froggy Evening; if it didn't have to be limited to Golden Jubilee shorts, then maybe Now Hear This in place of one of the Elmer Fudd cartoons and Nelly's Folley in place of High Note; if pre-1948 cartoons could be included - and it seems like Warner Home Video was initially hesitant about including those on video - then A Corny Concerto in place of either The Rabbit of Seville or What's Opera, Doc? and I Love to Singa in place of Long-Haired Hair)? Chuck Jones shorts (well, all of the ones in my first list for such a music-themed release would do.... but another good selection would be Duck Amuck, a Road Runner cartoon, a Pepe le Pew cartoon, something with either Hubie and Bertie, Charlie Dog, or Wolf and Sheepdog, and one of Jones' one-shots)? One-shots/minor characters (perhaps Water Water Every Hare, Nelly's Folley, Rabbit's Kin, and something with Taz and Marvin, respectively)?

There were two Marvin the Martin video compilations released in 1998, Space Tunes (which was originally part of the Stars of Space Jam line in certain countries, and lives up to it's space theme) and 50 Years on Earth!, which has two random cartoons that don't have Marvin the Martian or a space/science fiction theme. In thinking more about it, that video should have included Another Froggy Evening and Superior Duck, since both of them have cameos by Marvin - and technically, that would have completed his filmography among the two videos.

The Bugs Bunny Video Guide says that the international Bugs and Friends line was meant as a follow-up to the Stars of Space Jam series, but what made it a direct follow-up to that collection? At least in comparison to other video collections? Aside from both series having five volumes (which many of the video collections had) and six shorts per volume (and four of the Looney Tunes video collections from Warner Home Video had six cartoons per volume), as well as both being released on laserdisc in Japan.
nickramer  
#36 Posted : Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:35:48 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: speedy fast Go to Quoted Post


There were two Marvin the Martin video compilations released in 1998, Space Tunes (which was originally part of the Stars of Space Jam line in certain countries, and lives up to it's space theme) and 50 Years on Earth!, which has two random cartoons that don't have Marvin the Martian or a space/science fiction theme. In thinking more about it, that video should have included Another Froggy Evening and Superior Duck, since both of them have cameos by Marvin - and technically, that would have completed his filmography among the two videos.



Actually, that also happened with "Taz's Jungle Jams". It was also originally going to include ,among two other shorts, "Bushy Hare", but it was dropped at last minute. A still from that short is still shown on the back cover.
speedy fast  
#37 Posted : Thursday, March 16, 2017 4:31:02 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: nickramer Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: speedy fast Go to Quoted Post


There were two Marvin the Martin video compilations released in 1998, Space Tunes (which was originally part of the Stars of Space Jam line in certain countries, and lives up to it's space theme) and 50 Years on Earth!, which has two random cartoons that don't have Marvin the Martian or a space/science fiction theme. In thinking more about it, that video should have included Another Froggy Evening and Superior Duck, since both of them have cameos by Marvin - and technically, that would have completed his filmography among the two videos.



Actually, that also happened with "Taz's Jungle Jams". It was also originally going to include ,among two other shorts, "Bushy Hare", but it was dropped at last minute. A still from that short is still shown on the back cover.


I remember seeing the original announcement and content listings when it was announced. Giving it a jungle theme, I don't think the non-Taz choices were random (unlike the non-Marvin/non-space cartoons in one of the Marvin tapes). And Superior Duck also would have been an ideal choice for Taz's Jungle Jams as well (since Taz made a cameo there).
nickramer  
#38 Posted : Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:18:35 AM(UTC)
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Okay, here's a thought that I was wondering as long I remember and never shared it until now (warning: it's very silly): What is the white ring around Daffy neck? Is it a feather patch that most real adult wild mallards have or a neck cuff like some folks wear with a neck tie?
speedy fast  
#39 Posted : Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:52:30 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: nickramer Go to Quoted Post
Okay, here's a thought that I was wondering as long I remember and never shared it until now (warning: it's very silly): What is the white ring around Daffy neck? Is it a feather patch that most real adult wild mallards have or a neck cuff like some folks wear with a neck tie?


I've wondered that as well. I thought it was a collar of some sort. I think I've seen it off him once (thinking it was pulled off) but can't remember where I saw that. And if I am remembering right, would that be canon or just some kind of one-time cartoony gag (like if somebody gets blown up and is fine in the next scene)?
speedy fast  
#40 Posted : Sunday, March 19, 2017 10:18:01 AM(UTC)
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On the Looney Tunes on Television page at Jon Cooke's old Looney Tunes site at the Golden Age Cartoons website (which now links to the Golden Age Cartoons Facebook page, though I've heard that the website can be found via internet wayback machine), it was said that Warner Bros. put out three different television packages for the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts - one of the best-known shorts, which I think was for Saturday morning, one of secondary but highly-regarded cartoons, for weekday afternoon showings (on The Porky Pig Show, Merrie Melodies Starring Bugs Bunny and Friends, and That's Warner Bros.!/The Bugs 'N Daffy Show), and one that consisted of what was left, mainly what the other stations didn't really want to touch (I think that third package was made when Nickelodeon started airing the shorts). But the three packages also swapped cartoons every few years (which gets me wondering, if Warner Bros. and Turner Entertainment didn't merge and there was no attempt to make Cartoon Network the only channel to air the shorts, would Kids' WB have eventually swapped cartoons for other packages?), so it's really hard to commit to one package being the best of the best with another being b-list or c-list or whatever and another being the most lesser (well, if the black and white shorts and most of the post-1964 cartoons were left out of the other packages, then that makes it easy to fill them up, though I wonder how they were able to get the 1948-1964 cartoons Nickelodeon WAS able to air when the channel first got Looney Tunes).

I didn't watch The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show often (around 1992 my local ABC station showed local news instead of its Saturday morning programming, though I'd still constantly see ads for ABC Saturday morning programming... Shows I wanted to see but couldn't...), but I did see many of the "best of the best" shorts on Merrie Melodies, Kids' WB, and Nickelodeon (I wonder if I misremembered/misunderstood and it was possibly ABC that had the "well-regarded cartoons"). It was on Merrie Melodies that I first remember seeing such shorts as One Froggy Evening, the hunters trilogy, Show Biz Bugs, Bully for Bugs, Curtain Razor, Bugs and Thugs, Porky Pig's Feat, The Hasty Hare, and The Foghorn Leghorn, Kids' WB showed such classics as Speedy Gonzales (I think), The Rabbit of Seville, One Froggy Evening, Hare-Way to the Stars, Duck Dodgers and the 24 1/2 th Century, Duck Amuck, Robin Hood Daffy, Dough for the Dodo, and more (not to mention they had the rights to Rabbit Fire and Rabbit Seasoning yet only showed clips as part of the Hip Clip and Bugs 'n Daffy Show opening), in addition to eventually getting the rights to the pre-1948 cartoon library (both essential and lesser-known). And during the later years of Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon (around the time that Kids' WB started), the channel showed such classics as Three Little Bops, What's Opera, Doc?, The Daffy Doc, Get Rich Quick Porky, Show Biz Bugs, The Scarlett Pumpernickle, Duck Rabbit Duck, Operation: Rabbit, and others, not to mention that the redone Looney Tunes on Nickelodeon opening from 1992 included animation from such classics as Rabbit Seasoning, Hare-Way to the Stars, and Birds Anonymous. Of course it could be subjective as to whether something is "the best known of the best known" or "fairly popular" or whatever (though I think it is pretty much fact that cartoons like Duck Amuck, What's Opera, Doc?, One Froggy Evening, and Show Biz Bugs are among the most essential).

As a slight side-note, I remember when I was watching all those shows that I noticed that it seemed the various channels weren't overlapping, noticing a bit more in the late-1990s (after a sudden spike in Looney Tunes fandom), noticing I would see some cartoons on one channel but not the other. Nickelodeon had promos in 1992 promoting "more Looney Tunes" and I didn't really think much of what it meant (besides the "no Bosko, sorry Bosko" part... as an 8-year-old kid who enjoyed seeing the Bosko cartoons whenever I was somewhere that had Nickelodeon before my parents got cable, I was disappointed that Nickelodeon was no longer showing that character, though it was the first time I knew Bosko by name.... and I found it a little odd that they showed a clip and flat-out told us he wouldn't be back, I wonder if the shorts were proven to bring the channel bad enough ratings that they had to announce his absence). I also noticed some characters seemed to not appear on some shows. I first remember seeing a Road Runner short on Nickelodeon, when I was actively watching Merrie Melodies at the time (but afterwards I recall seeing Road Runner shorts there), Nick was also the first place I saw Pepe le Pew and Speedy Gonzales cartoons (and a lot of channels showed very few, if any, Speedy cartoons). For some reason, Kids' WB never showed any Road Runner (was it because of violence or did Warner simply make the mistake of not getting any in its television package?) though Wile E. Coyote was featured via Rabbits Feat, and at the time same, it seems like Nickelodeon stopped airing any Tweety cartoons and aired significantly less Yosemite Sam cartoons.
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